Schlieren Imaging – Seeing the Invisible

June 16, 2017 / 0 comments

“Schlieren photography is a visual process that is used to photograph the flow of fluids of varying density. Invented by the German physicist August Toepler in 1864 to study supersonic motion, it is widely used in aeronautical engineering to photograph the flow of air around objects. The classical implementation of an optical schlieren system uses…

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Gaia 3D Star Map

May 14, 2017 / 0 comments

Gaia is an ambitious mission to chart a three-dimensional map of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, in the process revealing the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will provide unprecedented positional and radial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce a stereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars in our…

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A New Era in Astronomy: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

May 12, 2017 / 0 comments

“The Hubble Space Telescope has completely revolutionized our understanding of the universe, and has become a beloved icon of popular culture. As revolutionary as Hubble has been, we have pushed it to its scientific limits in many ways. Hubble’s successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, has been in the works for almost two decades and…

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The Kepler Orrery V

May 11, 2017 / 0 comments

  All of the Kepler multi-planet systems (1705 planets in 685 systems as of 24 November 2015) on the same scale as the Solar System (the dashed lines). The size of the orbits are all to scale, but the size of the planets are not. For example, Jupiter is actually 11x larger than Earth, but…

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The Sound of Saturn

May 10, 2017 / 0 comments

The Cassini spacecraft has been detecting intense radio emissions from the planet Saturn. They come from the planet’s aurorae, where magnetic field lines thread the polar regions. These signals have been shifted into the range of human hearing and compressed in time. For more information about how NASA produced this track, go to…

CONDUCTIVE INK

January 30, 2016 / 0 comments

‘Conductive ink’ is an ink that results in a printed object which conducts electricity. The transformation from liquid ink to solid printing may involve drying, curing or melting processes. These inks may be classed as fired high solids systems or PTF polymer thick film systems that allow circuits to be drawn or printed on a…

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WRINKLES IN SPACE TIME AND THE WARPED ASTROPHYSICS OF INTERSTELLAR

January 30, 2016 / 0 comments

This article explores the power of rendering engines and a new understanding of the strangest objects in the universe; black holes. During the making if the movie ‘Interstellar’ the Visual effects team had to invent a way of rendering black holes with a realistic portrayal of how they worked. With the help of astrophysicist Kip…

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THE UNIVERSE FROM NOTHING

January 30, 2016 / 0 comments

Lawrence M. Krauss gives a lecture on how science embraces what we don’t know and how we create answers from some of the most profound experiments of the modern scientific era. This lecture not only exemplifies the nature of cutting edge science but also dives into the mentality of a scientist and how we should…

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WHEN SCIENCE SHAPES ARCHITECTURE

January 30, 2016 / 0 comments

Early modernist architects were fascinated by gigantic grain silos, sleek steam-liners, and smooth aircraft fuselages. They were inspired by objects that embodied the 20th century’s technological progress: unadorned curves and surfaces for a high-speed and functional age. While automobiles and jumbo jets have long since left the architectural limelight, and these days “sci-fi” architecture is…

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BIG DATA IS BETTER DATA

January 30, 2016 / 0 comments

Self-driving cars were just the start. What’s the future of big data-driven technology and design? In a thrilling science talk, Kenneth Cukier looks at what’s next for machine learning — and human knowledge.